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In the InfoSec world this week: The US arrests Marcus Hutchings, the gent who found the WannaCry kill-switch, Hacked Chrome plugin hijacks 1m+ users and the WannaCry criminals cash out.
According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Marcus Hutchings who found and activated the kill switch in the recent WannaCry ransomware, has been arrested on suspicion of creating Kronos, the bank account raiding malware. Emerging details are coming up everywhere, but a tip of the hat to Joseph Cox at motorerboard.vice.com and our friends theregister.co.uk for keeping everyone information.
A rather popular Chrome extension was hijacked last week to inject unwanted ads and code into browsers. The hijack was carried out by simply hacking the creators google account through a phish. Anyone using the Web Developer for Chrome extension should update to version 0.5 immediately. This is further proof that even sensible people can fall for a good phishing attack. Treating all email as suspicious until proven otherwise is a good starting point for defending against phishing attacks.
The criminals behind WannaCry have finally cashed out, but are paranoid that we are watching their bitcoin trail so are using a Swiss company to launder the cash. Last week the criminals starting laundering their crime proceeds. Using Shapeshift.io, they started converting their Bitcoin into Monero, a currency that is very hard to track proving beyond doubt this was a money make crime.
Insightful &
Helpful Articles

Here is what we're working on and
thinking at Hedgehog security.

In our weekly round up of cyber security news events, we look at the U.K government's guidelines on smart vehicles; ransom demands at HBO; the upcoming court appearance for the 'WannaCry Hero'; and more.
Monday 7th August
UK Regulations to Crack Down on Car Hacking.
The U.K. government released new regulation guidelines on Sunday (6th August) that call on makers of internet-connected cars and trucks to place more stringent cybersecurity protections in the vehicles to prevent against hackers.
This is in response to worries that smart vehicles could be used by hackers to gain personal information, steal vehicles and potentially take control of the technology inside. The new regulation guidelines also aim to get engineers at auto companies to design the smart vehicles in a way that reduces the threat of hacking.
Tuesday 8th August
HBO Hackers Demand Ransom.
When hackers broke into the HBO's network last week to leak a number of unreleased shows, no one was quite sure of their motives. However it has since come to light that hackers have demanded an undisclosed amount of money from HBO in order to stop internal data from continuing to be released. The money was supposed to be sent via the crypto-currency Bitcoin.
HBO hasn't commented on the ransom so far and it is understood they will not pay. This may be due to a similar case when a hacking group called Dark Overlord stole unreleased shows from Netflix and others. However when the hackers were paid their ransom, more shows were leaked online regardless which Dark Overlord claimed was due to Netflix talking to the FBI.
Wednesday 9th August:
Creating Secure Passwords.
When it comes to setting up a secure password, you may assume that it must include a mix of random letters, numbers and special characters. However Bill Burr, who created guidelines on how to make passwords back in 2003, during his time as a midlevel manager at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, now says he regrets this advice.
The guideline, called “NIST Special Publication 800-63. Appendix A,” suggested changing your password every 90 days and using a variety of characters which then became widely used on websites.
Instead, Bill Burr argues it would be far more effective to pick four random words which will come as a welcome relief to those who tend to forget their numerous passwords.
Thursday 10th August:
Report Warns of Chinese Hackers Targeting IT Service Providers.
In a joint report, security providers BAE Systems and PwC have warned that Chinese hackers have been targeting third-party IT providers in order to gain data of the companies they serve.
The major IT suppliers that have become top targets for the hacking group known as APT10 tend to specialise in cloud storage, help desk and application management and often have direct access to their clients' networks.
It is believed that that APT10 are stealing intellectual property as part of a global cyber espionage campaign.
Richard Horne, cyber security partner at PwC, commented, “New forms of attack require new ways of working to defend our society. Close working collaboration is key.”
Friday 11th August:
'WannaCry Hero' to appear in US court.
Marcus Hutchins, the British cyber security researcher who stopped the spread of the infamous WannaCry ransomware, will appear in court on Monday 14th August in Milwaukee.
Hutchins was initially hailed a hero for his discovery of the “kill switch” that put an end to the ransomware and then worked with the National Cyber Security Centre to continue mitigating the threat. However the 23-year-old is now facing allegations of involvement in a separate piece of malware called Kronos which targeted bank accounts and could land Hutchins with a 40-year prison sentence.
Hutchins has been defended by many in the cyber security community who do not believe that he would have knowingly had any part in criminal activity.
 
What are your thoughts on the news stories covered? Was there any other cyber security news that caught your attention last week? Get in touch on Facebook to let us know!